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20110801
20110831
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
call the magical mystery tour, the best ceo's which were the sort of steve jobs and all the greatest. so they came back from the tour and they said you know, you are right. we like having a ceo and we know just the person who can be the ceo. steve jobs. [laughter] >> he was a little busy and i don't know if he was going to do that, but john finally got them to look at eric and there's a number of reasons they respect him. he had technical jobs and had a program that they liked and iraq was also smart enough to know he couldn't go in and say i am of the adelstein going to run this thing, step aside and let me make the decisions. instead, he adopted preconscious it seemed to me stance at every point, and i heard this a lot, talking about how early and larry and sergey work. he would talk about how much he learned from larry and sergey and eric what do these things that google that helped to make it an effective corporation, but he yielded some of his autonomy. there was this troika system where on some important matters they voted and you could say that in certain respects larry and se
work. in our world, that man is steve jobs. steve jobs dropped out of college. he was an orphan. a guy that just came out of nowhere. think what he accomplished simply because he loves it. he is obsessed with this stuff. these are toys for him to play with, a campus rim to pay not. when he founded apple computer he completely transformed the computer industry from a command to control mainframe model to an individual empowerment desktop waddle. he made that happen. a few years later, he bought an obscure little digital rendering company on fire sale when george lucas needed to get rid of it, called pixar. he had this idea that this could be used to create full-length animated movies. he thought that would be pretty cool. he would like to see a movie like that so he found this guy named john lasseter and they worked on a movie that would eventually be called toy story. he spent so many years on it and so much a steve jobs's when he came near to personal bankruptcy funding it and they also almost and discontinued boy story. toy stories in the top 10 dig is grossing movies of all time. ha
. [applause] >> thank you very much, steve. i'm a great lover of this wonderful institution, the national constitution center and i also wanted to remind you that we have an exhibit upstairs in posterity hauled between the signers hall and the main exhibit area on lincoln that i hope you will get to take a look at some time in the coming weeks. it is obligatory for a person sitting in this chair to praise the author and to praise his luck, and ethically i think anyone who agrees to perform my role as interlocutor has to genuinely believe that and the other occasions in which i have done this, i have done this. but this really is in a cage and in which i want to go a little little bit over the top because i do think adam is a very special historian and this is a very very special book. as steve described adam's career he really has been at a remarkably early age a very important public intellectual. speaking to a wide audience about a wide variety of subjects i think since he graduated from harvard, not that long ago. and now he has undertaken -- it is hard to believe and by the way i have
officers. two questions for steve. the core of your presentation is comparing effect sizes from impact study of head start with several other types of studies. i'm interested in whether those studies are capturing information on disadvantaged kids that are similar in their background characteristics to the kids in head start. a week comparing apples to apples? second question would be what is your point of view on the reform strategy that the administration is following? would you recommend anything different other than your call for more effective practice? >> thank you. we are comparing apples to apples. to the extent there are differents and the population they're biased against studies that serve broader population because effect are bigger than more disadvantaged kids are. lets only look at the kids who could get in to head start. the differences are bigger if you do that. i applaud what the administration is doing but it is a classic management problem here. there is a natural reaction in any administration of any program when there is bad news to increase regulation. i think hea
not oversee the entire project. host: steve, ill., democratic line. caller: i want to just let you know. i'm going to be voting for president obama. host: you think the deal helps the president? caller: yes, i do. host: mike, dover, ohio. caller: i would like to welcome everyone from dover, ohio. i fail to understand why iowa has a big importance as been the first caucus or whatever. my understanding is they have a straw poll, a caucus, and a primary later. the straw poll and the caucus are strictly people that have been paid to show up. they are given transportation and whatever. host: mike glover, a little clarification there? guest: the straw poll is an event where candidates do bus people to the straw poll to vote for them. they pass out tickets. so, it is a competition. who can turn out people to show off at a particular place, at a particular night, to vote for a particular candidate? the reason i like is first is because history, tradition, by what is a place where you have to come and talk to real people. you have to go out and campaign. you cannot just throw a bunch of money at th
meaning to leave town, but not wanting to leave too fast to kids they didn't want the onlooker steve inc. the earp had that been down and made them leave. any number of things might have prevented this. even if that up in the case, something similar would've happened sometime soon. >> unitas says after the gunfight, they could reasonably walk away feeling they were heroes. that didn't happen. what does that tell us about tombstone? >> first of all, i think virgil small made was when he settled i don't cannot. i think the earp's moment came the day after the gunfight when instead of being recognized as heroes, which they were expecting company that 2000 mourners turning out for the l.a. kelantan and mclaury brothers. the tombstone leaders -- by the way, one of the things about historians like land is they don't just want to have a different opinion looking at the same set of facts. it's the open-mindedness that encourages discussion rather than arguments. i've learned so much from him. i think we all have. but what i thought i was talking about -- hang on to second. it's been a long day w
to live in both worlds. i wanted to take a minute to say that i think we have just seen steve jobs step down as ceo of apple to become chairman and if you look at -- the only person i have ever known who was able to actually merge the two world's completely with an artist's i as well as the definition of what great engineering is. i am sure he and the company will do well in the future. from my perspective that is the perfect example of the kind of union we see in the future in other companies and other collaboration's. from my perspective, this is the first time the mctaggart collector has been given by someone not employed in television broadcasting or production. i don't know if that mean the bar has been raised or lowered but i will do my best. it is an honor to be here. as an outsider, when he spoke here two years ago james murdoch described himself as a crazy relative everyone is embarrassed by. i wonder what he would say now. [applause] if james is the family outcast i am not sure what that makes me. am i the geek in the corner? mit alien species? am i the android? you get the id
to him. nobody ever called me and i get a lot of calls. nobody ever called my colleague steve millions who was excellent in wrongful confessions. his name was wrong to us. and it was only through this incredible sequence of events that got you this -- katherine the attorney that really pushed this case forward because my reading of the chicago magazine article about this case a couple of years ago was that your public defender thought you were kind of slick and didn't trust you. >> one of them. >> one of them. one of them didn't. so he wasn't going to call the newspapers to get anything going. he wasn't going to bring any pressure. >> and, you know, cathy and i debated that -- cathy is just not the type to self-aggrandize. she is unlike so many criminal defense lawyers in chicago. she will not call a press conference for herself. but weigh debated seriously before we started the trial, we thought should we, you know, call you guys and say, look, this guy has been in here five years and nine months without a trial. for someone who has never had -- you know, an arrest or anything, no inv
a corporate to a large degree, not to mention a television station. steve got that problem. but i think whether you run within the democratic party or not, i give you do not become cynical, do not give up on the political process. we are fighting for not only our generation, but for our kids and our grandchildren. i have six grandchildren. i take their future seriously. okay? and we do not have the option of not fighting. we can beat these guys. we can beat them. nobody believes in their ideology. nobody thinks that children in america should not have health care or that workers should not have lights. [applause] they are a fringe movement, and if the democrats have the guts to go out and organize, if we work together on this thing, we can beat them and beat them badly. [applause] but we can't do it -- i know that it's hard. look, i know. people all over the country are disappointed. i'm disappointed. but you can't give up. we have to raise that progressive agenda, make it loud and clear, organize people about that, educate. because what we are fighting for is so important it is the fut
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)